How does a hard disk drive work?

Subject Introduction to Computer System
NU Year Set: 4.(d) Marks: 4 Year: 2010

How does a hard disk drive work

In your computer's hard drive, there aren't really any iron nails. There's just a large shiny, circular "plate" of magnetic material called a platter, divided into billions of tiny areas. Each one of those areas can be independently magnetized (to store a 1) or demagnetized (to store a 0). Magnetism is used in computer storage because it goes on storing information even when the power is switched off. If you magnetize a nail, it stays magnetized until you demagnetize it. In much the same way, the computerized information (or data) stored in your PC hard drive or iPod stays there even when you switch the power off.

The platters are the most important parts of a hard drive. As the name suggests, they are disks made from a hard material such as glass, ceramic, or aluminum, which is coated with a thin layer of metal that can be magnetized or demagnetized. A small hard drive typically has only one platter, but each side of it has a magnetic coating. Bigger drives have a series of platters stacked on a central spindle, with a small gap in between them. The platters rotate at up to 10,000 revolutions per minute (rpm) so the read-write heads can access any part of them.

There are two read-write heads for each platter, one to read the top surface and one to read the bottom, so a hard drive that has five platters (say) would need ten separate read-write heads. The read-write heads are mounted on an electrically controlled arm that moves from the center of the drive to the outer edge and back again. To reduce wear and tear, they don't actually touch the platter: there's a layer of fluid or air between the head and the platter surface.

 

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